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“The only thing necessary for these diseases to the triumph is for good people and governments to do nothing.”

    


  



HIV Database Speeds Cure Hunt

Australian-Developed HIV Vaccine Trial Announced

HIV Increasing in Australia

New Gloves Designed For Better Heatlth Protection

 

HIV Database Speeds Cure Hunt


Associated Press (06.06.03)

In New Mexico, two Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have spent countless hours keeping an online database on HIV updated. "HIV is really heavily studied, but still 50 million people have died or are dying from it," said Bette Korber.

The database lets researchers look at the genetic makeup of a strain of the virus and compare it with other strains - at last count there were 86,000, with more evolving all the time.

Researchers can determine what part of the world a particular strain came from and instantly find genetic markers, literature and other information to speed their work. The database is free to researchers, and new information is added frequently.

  


 



Posted 11/06/03


Australian-Developed HIV Vaccine Trial Announced    POSTED!


Australian Associated Press (04.06.03)

In Sydney today, the Australian-Thai HIV Vaccine Consortium announced that recruitment of volunteers has begun for the first clinical trials of a new Australian-developed HIV vaccine. The trial, to take place at Sydney's St. Vincent's Hospital, will involve 24 HIV-negative volunteers. "We will be able to undertake a range of sophisticated laboratory tests to determine if the vaccines stimulate the human immune system to produce anti-HIV responses," said principal investigator Dr. Tony Kelleher of the University of New South Wales.

The vaccine is based on "prime and boost" technology, which combines modified HIV DNA with a fowl pox virus. Results are expected by the end of the year. The trial is funded by a grant from the US National Institutes of Health and the Australian government.

Posted 06/06/03


HIV Increasing in Australia


Australian Associated Press (29.05.03)::Judy Skatssoon

Australia's HIV infection rate is increasing, with the latest figures showing worrying trends in the nation's three most populous states. Last year, 700 Australians, mainly gay and bisexual men, were infected with HIV. Records show new HIV infections rose by 7 percent in Victoria and 20 percent in
Queensland in 2002. Bill Whittaker, president of the top national AIDS body, the Australian Federation of AIDS Organizations, said final figures for New South Wales had not been confirmed but were understood to show an increase of between 3 percent and 8 percent. Tasmania also saw a small increase in its infection rates.

Posted 06/06/03

  


 

New Gloves Designed For Better Heatlth Protection   Posted!


London (Reuters) 28/05/03

A rubber goods company is developing gloves that may help to protect healthcare workers from viruses such as HIV and hepatitis C.
Instead of thin latex which can easily be punctured with a needle, or split, the new G-VIR gloves consist of two layers of synthetic rubber with disinfectant liquid between them. "As soon as a needle or other sharp object punctures the glove, the disinfectant liquid is released onto the wound," New Scientist magazine said on Wednesday.

In laboratory tests of the gloves made by French-based firm Hutchinson, the number of virus particles entering a wound was reduced. In tests on animals, the material reduced the infection rate by up to 60 percent. Full clinical trials start late this year, the magazine added.

Posted 06/06/03