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“The only thing necessary for these diseases to the triumph is for good people and governments to do nothing.”

 

 

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
HEADQUARTERS, WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER
WASHINGTON, DC 20307-5001

http://www.wramc.amedd.army.mil/

WRAMC Regulation 6 April 1999
No. 40-615
Medical Services

1. Purpose: To prescribe policies, responsibilities and procedures for implementation of the Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan (BBPECP) to meet the letter and intent of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). OSHA has enacted this standard to "reduce occupational exposure to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other bloodborne pathogens". This plan details measures WRAMC and its employees will take to decrease the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens and provide appropriate treatment and counseling should an employee be exposed to bloodborne pathogens. This regulation supercedes WRAMC Regulation dated, 26 Aug 1996.

2. Applicability: This plan is applicable to all personnel working in all of Walter Reed Army Medical Center's (WRAMC) clinical and administrative activities. Tenant units will comply with applicable portions of this plan and supplement it with their own plan as necessary. Any tenant having employees with occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens as defined in this regulation is required to develop an exposure control plan in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1030. This plan also applies to medical care for bloodborne pathogen exposure provided to non-employee, military health-care beneficiaries not covered under 29 CFR 1910.1030.

3. References: Required and related references are listed in Appendix A. Prescribed and referenced forms are also listed in Appendix A.

4. Abbreviations/Terms: Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

5. Joint Commission Standards: Standards IC.1 through IC.6 of the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations Accreditation Manual for Hospitals apply throughout this publication.

6. General Philosophy: There are a number of "good general principles" that should be followed when working with bloodborne pathogens. These include:

a. It is prudent to minimize all exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials.

b. Risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens should never be underestimated.

c. WRAMC will institute as many engineering and work practice controls as possible to eliminate or minimize employee exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

7. Responsibilities:

a. Commander, WRAMC will issue a command policy statement demonstrating support for full compliance with the BBPECP.

b. Deputy Commander for Clinical Services will monitor the overall compliance with the BBPECP.

c. Department and service chiefs and all supervisory personnel will ensure that:

(1) All personnel in positions listed in the Exposure Determination section of this plan receive training as outlined in the Information and Training section of this plan annually.

(2) All personnel undergo immunization review and latex allergy screening on initial employment and annually thereafter.

(3) The hepatitis B vaccine immunization program is implemented in accordance with (IAW) the provisions of this regulation.

(4) Required personal protective equipment (PPE) and engineering controls are available to all personnel at no cost to the employee. This will also include low or no latex supplies and equipment for those employees who are latex sensitive.

(5) All employees use protective practices outlined in this plan.

(6) Compliance is monitored and evidence of results and actions taken to correct problems is maintained.

(7) Employees are supervised in the related practices, the need for further training is evaluated, and remedial action is taken as needed.

(8) Policies and procedures in the department support compliance with the provisions of this plan.

(9) A copy of the BBPECP is accessible to all employees on any shift.

(10) Employees who have had exposure incidents report to the ER for initial evaluation and to the Occupational Health Clinic (OHC) for evaluation and follow-up.

(11) The source of the BBP exposure is evaluated in accordance with this plan if the source is still present in their area of responsibility.

(12) All personnel are oriented as required in the Information and Training section of this plan before they begin work.

d. Employees will:

(1) Have their immunization status and latex allergy screening reviewed on initial employment and annually thereafter.

(2) Comply with the hepatitis B vaccine immunization program as specified in this regulation.

(3) Know what tasks they perform that have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

(4) Attend initial and annual refresher bloodborne pathogens training sessions.

(5) Plan and conduct all operations including use of PPE in accordance with this BBPECP and departmental infection control policies.

(6) Use good personal hygiene practices and report or correct any unsafe practices that may lead to bloodborne pathogen exposure.

(7) Report all exposure incidents to their supervisor and follow evaluation guidelines as per this document, to include periodic follow-up through the OHC.

e. Infection Control Service will:

(1) Provide consultation and assistance with equipment, policies, and practices as requested.

(2) In cooperation with the Occupational Health Section, provide initial and annual refresher training for all employees to meet the provisions of the BBP Standard and maintain the training records required by the BBP Standard.

(3) Update hospital infection control policies as necessary.

(4) Assist departments in meeting the orientation provisions of the Information and Training section of this plan when requested.

(5) Annually, or as required, review and if necessary update this plan with the Occupational Health Section.

(6) Monitor implementation and compliance with this plan in conjunction with the Preventive Medicine Service and the Safety Office.

(7) Review the feasibility and testing of new engineering controls as they become available.

(8) In coordination with the Occupational Health Section, analyze BBP incident data to identify trends and propose preventive measures. Data analysis will be presented to the appropriate department for implementation/action as indicated.

f. Preventive Medicine Service will:

(1) Serve as the proponent of the BBPECP and in

coordination with the Infection Control Service ensure its annual review and revision whenever necessary.

(2) Monitor implementation and compliance with the BBPECP in conjunction with the Infection Control Service and with the Safety Office.

g. Occupational Health Section, Preventive Medicine Service will:

(1) Operate an Occupational Health Clinic for WRAMC employees.

(2) Manage the hepatitis B vaccination, post-exposure evaluation, and follow-up provisions of this plan in conjunction with the Department of Allergy and Immunology.

(3) With the Infection Control Service, provide training for all employees to meet the provisions of the BBP Standard.

(4) Report all exposure incidents to the Safety office for documentation in OSHA Log 200 or Federal log equivalent for reporting occupational injuries and illnesses. Work with Safety Office to develop preventive strategies to reduce exposure incidents.

(5) Screen all employees on initial employment and annually thereafter for latex sensitivity. Those employees who have possible sensitivity to latex will be referred to the Allergy and/or Dermatology Clinic for further evaluation and will be placed on low or no latex exposure precaution.

(6) Provide initial orientation during inprocessing to all employees who may be exposed to BBP.

(7) Coordinate the review of the BBPECP annually or as required and update if necessary.

h. Community Health Nursing Section, Preventive Medicine Service will:

(1) Provide follow-up counseling to employees involved in exposure incidents with high risks for HIV or hepatitis, upon referral from the Occupational Health Clinic.

(2) Provide follow-up evaluation and counseling of non- employee military health care beneficiaries exposed to BBP who seek care at WRAMC.

i. Safety Office will:

(1) Collect data on all exposure incidents to bloodborne pathogens and develop or recommend remedial actions to reduce exposures. Data collected will be reported to the Safety Committee.

(2) Ensure all exposure incidents are properly documented on the OSHA 200 or Federal Log equivalent for reporting occupational injuries and illnesses.

(3) Investigate reports of circumstances in which an employee declines to use Personal Protective Equipment IAW para. 11.c.(1)(d) of this document.

(4) Monitor compliance during routine inspections.

j. Department of Allergy and Immunology will:

(1) Implement the Hepatitis B Vaccine Immunization Program IAW the provisions of this regulation.

(2) Provide consultation and guidance on need and timing for checking immune titers and/or re-vaccination.

(3) Provide evaluation (and definitive diagnosis if possible) to all employees who may have an allergic latex sensitivity.

k. Infectious Disease Service will:

(1) Provide consultation for employees who sustain high-risk exposures or need HIV prophylaxis as per current published medical guidelines.

(2) Provide evaluation and treatment for all active duty employees who develop a subsequent infection after an exposure incident.

(3) Provide evaluation and offer treatment for all Department of the Army civilian employees who develop a subsequent infection after an exposure incident. Long-term care will be on a case by case basis.

l. Emergency Medicine Service will:

(1) Ensure that all emergency room staff are trained and knowledgeable on the evaluation and treatment, required for employees who sustain an exposure incident as defined in this document.

(2) Provide evaluation, treatment, referral and consultation for employees who sustain an exposure incident as defined in this document.

(3) Ensure that copies of the evaluation, treatment, and consultation for employees who sustain an exposure incident are available or forwarded to the OHC.

m. Directorate of Logistics will:

(1) Adequately stock levels of personal protective clothing and equipment to include low or no latex items.

(2) Provide general housekeeping services in Building 2, Heaton Pavilion.

n. Patient Administration Directorate will:

(l) Ensure military health records are maintained IAW AR 40-66, Medical Record Administration.

(2) Provide a copy of the information to consulting health-care professionals as a result of any exposure to bloodborne pathogen upon request.

<3> Keep the information in these medical records confidential. Information will not be disclosed to anyone without employees written consent, except as required by law or regulation.

o. Quality Improvement Office will:

(1) Coordinate a program for initial and annual training which meets the provisions of the BBP Standards.

(2) Collect written verification of attendance at training sessions and provide to Infection Control Service and NESD Training Database Manager.

p. Nursing Education and Staff Development will ensure that the list of attendees at training sessions provided by the Quality Improvement Office is computerized by the NESD Training Database Manager and a monthly report of attendance is provided to each department chief.

q. Contractor and civilian training programs will:

(l) Conform to all provisions of this BBPECP and 29 CFR 1910.1030.

(2) Provide pre-placement BBP and CDC Standard Precautions training and hepatitis B vaccine immunization prior to working at WRAMC and BBP and CDC Standard Precaution training annually to all personnel identified in the contract as having occupational exposure as defined in Appendix B of this regulation.

(3) Maintain training and immunization records for contract personnel and students with occupational exposure.

(4) Provide medical follow-up for all BBP exposure incidents.

(5) Contractors with personnel identified by the contract as having occupational exposure as defined in this regulation will have their own BBPECP which will be compatible with this regulation and submitted as part of the contract.

r. Directorate of Contracting and Contract Officer Representatives will:

(1) Ensure that contracts for personnel identified as having occupational exposure to BBP contain the requirement to comply with all provisions of this regulation and 29 CFR 1910.1030 including hepatitis B immunization, BBP training, BBP exposure incident follow-up, records maintenance and BBPECP.

(2) Monitor compliance by contractors with this regulation.

(3) Ensure that any BBPECP is reviewed by the Occupational Health Section and Infection Control Service.

s. Medical Center Volunteers will:

(l) Conform to all provisions of this BBPECP.

(2) Be medically screened by the OHC and receive pre-placement immunization review and receive, or decline in writing, the hepatitis B vaccine immunization in accordance with the provision of this regulation.

(3) Receive initial bloodborne pathogen and CDC Standard

Precautions training provided by WRAMC prior to volunteering and annually thereafter.

t. Resource Management Division will ensure that Memorandums of Agreement for all civilian training programs in which students will have occupational exposure to BBP as defined in this regulation contain the requirement to comply with all provisions of this regulation and 29 CFR 1910.1030, including hepatitis B vaccine immunization, BBP training, BBP exposure incident follow-up and records maintenance.

u. Graduate Medical Education Office will:

(1) Monitor compliance by students in civilian training programs with the hepatitis B vaccine immunization and BBP training provisions of this regulation.

(2) Notify the civilian training program regarding any student who has not complied with the requirement.

8. Availability of the BBPECP: A copy of the BBPECP will be available on every shift in work areas where there is the potential for blood and body fluid exposure.

9. Review And Update of the BBPECP: The Preventive Medicine Service and the Infection Control Service are responsible for reviewing the plan annually and for revising it whenever necessary.

10. Exposure Determination:

a. All employee positions within the Medical Treatment Facility have been evaluated for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens as defined as "reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of the employee’s duties", regardless of the use of personal protective equipment.

b. The resulting exposure determination and the hepatitis B vaccine immunization policy are contained in

11. Methods of Compliance:

a. General.

(1) The BBP Standard which was published in 1987 called for The implementation of Universal Precautions to prevent contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials. Universal Precautions required all employees to treat blood, body fluids and tissues of all patients as potentially infectious with HBV, HIV, and other bloodborne pathogens. Precautions were intended to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane and skin exposure to blood and body fluids.

(2) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revised their isolation guidelines and have replaced the category of Universal Precautions with Standard Precautions.

(3) Standard Precautions combines the major features of Universal Precautions, designed to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens, and Body Substance Isolation, designed to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens from moist body substances.

(4) Standard Precautions applies to:

(a) Blood.

(b) All body fluids, secretions, and excretions except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood. Sweat is not considered to be infectious unless contaminated by visible blood.

(c) Non-intact skin.

(d) Mucous membranes.

(5) Standard Precautions will be used in the care of all patients regardless of their diagnosis or presumed infection status to reduce the risk of transmission of microorganisms from both recognized and unrecognized sources of infections.

(6) Standard Precautions include: hand washing, use of PPE, handling patient-care equipment, environmental control, handling of linen, patient placement, and occupational methods for reducing the risk of bloodborne pathogen exposure.

b. Engineering and Work Practice Controls.

(1) General

(a) Engineering and work practice controls will be implemented as the primary means of eliminating or minimizing employee exposure to blood and body fluids. When occupational exposure remains after institution of engineering and work practice controls, PPE will be used.

(b) Engineering controls are controls that either isolate the employee from the hazard or remove the hazard from the workplace. Examples include sharps disposal containers, bio-safety cabinets, splash guards, and needleless IV systems.

(c) Work practice controls are those that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in which a task is performed. An example of a required work practice control is prohibiting recapping of needles with a two-handed technique.

(d) All employees will be trained by their supervisor in the use of any engineering control before they are required to use it.

(2) Handwashing.

(a) Handwashing facilities will be readily accessible to employees. Approved alcohol based waterless hand cleansers and paper towels must be used in all areas where sinks are not readily available.

(b) Handwashing technique: Wet hands and apply soap; lather for 10-15 seconds insuring that fingernails and areas between fingers are washed; rinse thoroughly; dry hands with individual paper towels; and turn off faucet using a clean, dry paper towel.

(c) Employees will wash their hands immediately or as soon as feasible after removal of gloves or other personal protective equipment.

(d) Employees using a waterless hand cleaner must wash hands with soap and running water as soon as feasible.

(e) Employees will wash hands and any other skin with soap and water, or flush mucous membranes with water, immediately or as soon as feasible following contact of such body areas with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

(f) Hand cream application is permitted if the hands are thoroughly washed immediately prior to application. Hand creams must be from small, individual, nonrefillable containers and not shared between individuals.

(3) Prevention of Sharps Injuries.

(a) Contaminated needles and other contaminated sharps will not be bent, sheared, or broken.

(b) Contaminated needles will not be recapped or removed from syringes unless it can be demonstrated that there is no feasible alternative or the action is required by specific medical procedure. The two exceptions where recapping the needle is permitted are: performing a blood gas and administering incremental doses of a medication such as an anesthetic to the same patient. Removing the needle from a vacutainer sleeve is permitted only in the phlebotomy room of the laboratory. Other areas should use disposable vacutainer sleeves. Recapping with the traditional two-handed method is prohibited. Recapping, when permitted, will be performed with the one-hand scoop method (the hand holding the sharp is used to scoop up the cap from a flat surface) or by using forceps to replace the cap. Removing the needle from a vacutainer sleeve will be done using the special area on the sharps container where the needle is inserted and the vacutainer is used to unscrew the needle and the needle drops into the sharps container or using another device such as forceps. (NOTE: Other exceptions must be submitted to the Infection Control Committee for approval. Applications must include a justification for the need to recap or remove a needle.)

(c) Immediately, or as soon as feasible after use, contaminated needles or other sharps will be placed in leakproof, puncture resistant sharps containers by the person using the sharps. Sharps containers are located in patient rooms and in other areas as close to where sharps are used as feasible. Sharps containers in patient rooms are in a wall cabinet. This cabinet and the disposable sharps liners are to be labeled with a biohazard symbol IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan. Chemotherapy sharps containers will be labeled IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan. All other sharps containers will be red in color.

(d) A red sharps container will be available in the Fabric Care Facility.

(e) Disposable sharps containers will be removed and replaced with a new one when 3/4 full. They will be closed off by securely locking the closure mechanism and placed in the Regulated Medical Waste area for pick-up by housekeeping. If a sharps container is found to be leaking, it must be placed in a larger sharps container which will then be labeled and sealed. The OIC in each work area is responsible for insuring that sharps containers are replaced when 3/4 full and are not overfilled.

(f) Contaminated reusable sharps will be placed in containers until properly processed. The containers are puncture-resistant, leakproof on the sides and bottom, and labeled with a biohazard label IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan. The containers need not be closable. Employees will not reach by hand into these containers. Employees will not reach into a water-filled sink or pan to retrieve contaminated instruments. Instead a perforated tray can be used or the instruments can be retrieved with a reliable hand-held device (e.g. forceps). A closed container for reusable sharps will also be available in the Fabric Care Facility.

(g) Instrument pans or other reusable containers used for sharp instruments will be cleaned with soap and water and then disinfected with a 1:10 solution of bleach or sterilized after each use.

(h) Where there are no in-room sharps containers(e.g. in psychiatric units), needle users have two options: Carry a small sharps container to the room to immediately discard the sharp or use a self-sheathing needle/syringe unit.

(i) A needleless IV system will be used for access into IV lines. Stopcocks may also be used.

(j) A self-sheathing IV catheter is available for

starting peripheral IVs.

(k) Sharps containers must be mounted on solid surfaces unless under constant observation.

(4) Engineering Controls.

(a) Bio-safety cabinets and splash guards will be used in laboratories to minimize splashing, spraying, splattering, and generation of droplets.

(b) Engineering controls will be examined and maintained or replaced on a regular schedule to insure their effectiveness i.e. that they have not been removed or broken, that ventilation systems of bio-safety cabinets are functioning properly, and that filters are replaced frequently enough. The OIC in each work area will establish a written inspection and routine maintenance schedule for the engineering controls in that area.

(c) The Hospital Product Committee will review the feasibility of testing engineering controls as new ones enter the market.

(5) Handling and Packaging. All specimens of blood, body fluids, and tissues will be handled using CDC Standard Precautions and will be transported in sealed clear plastic bags. Specimen containers will be securely closed before placing in the bag. If outside contamination of the bag or primary container occurs, the bag or primary container shall be placed within a second container which prevents leakage during handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping. If the specimen could puncture the primary container, the primary container will be placed within a second container which is puncture resistant. Containers used for transporting or shipping specimens outside the facility will be puncture resistant and will be labeled with a biohazard label IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan.

(6) Contaminated Equipment. Equipment which may be contaminated with blood or body fluids will be examined prior to servicing or shipping and will be decontaminated as necessary. If decontamination of the equipment is not possible (personnel do not have training to take apart technologically advanced equipment or equipment design prohibits cleaning), a readily observable label will be attached to the equipment stating which portion may be contaminated and this information will be conveyed to all affected employees, the servicing representative, and/or the manufacturer, as appropriate, prior to handling, servicing, or shipping so that appropriate precautions will be taken. See section on Labels and Signs for required label characteristics. See Section on Housekeeping for instructions on decontamination. Biomedical maintenance personnel will be instructed in precautions to practice during decontamination of equipment.

(7) Work Practice Controls.

(a) All procedures involving blood or other body fluids shall be performed in such a manner as to minimize splashing, spraying, spattering, and generation of droplets of these substances.

(b) Mouth pipetting/suctioning of blood or other body fluids is prohibited.

(c) Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling contact lenses are prohibited in all work areas where there is a reasonable likelihood of occupational exposure. Eating or drinking are permitted only in designated areas separate from contaminated areas. Employees must remove any contaminated clothing or protective barriers prior to entering the clean area.

(d) Food and drink shall not be placed in refrigerators, freezers, shelves, cabinets, or on countertops or benchtops where blood or other potentially infectious materials are present or where specimens have been placed.

(e) Employees who have exudative lesions or weeping dermatitis will not perform or assist in invasive procedures or other direct patient care activities or handle equipment used for patient care.

c. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

(1) General

(a) Supervisors will ensure that personal protective equipment in the appropriate sizes is readily available to employees in each work area that requires it. Supervisors will insure that employees are trained in its use and use it as required.

(b) PPE is provided at no cost to the employee and includes, but is not limited to, gloves, gowns, laboratory coats, face shields, masks, eye protection, and mouthpieces, resuscitation bags, pocket masks, or other ventilation devices.

(c) PPE is considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through to or reach the employee's work clothes, street clothes, undergarments, skin, eyes, mouth, or other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for the duration of time which the PPE will be used.

(d) Supervisors will ensure that employees use

appropriate PPE, unless the supervisor can show that the employee temporarily and briefly declined to use PPE when, under rare and extraordinary circumstances, it was the employee's professional judgment that in the specific instance its use would have prevented the delivery or health care or public safety services or would have posed an increased hazard to the safety of the worker or a co-worker. When an employee makes this judgment, the supervisor will investigate and document the circumstances. The documentation will be forwarded to the Safety Manager no later than the next duty day. The supervisor and the Safety Manager will determine whether changes need to be instituted to prevent such occurrences in the future. A decision not to use protective barriers will not be applied to a particular work area or a recurring task. Neither interference with ease of performance of a procedure nor improper fit are acceptable reasons to not use PPE.

(e) Failure to use PPE, except under the circumstances listed above, may result in disciplinary action.

(f) Supervisors will ensure that PPE in the appropriate sizes is readily accessible at the worksite or is issued to employees. Hypoallergenic gloves, glove liners, powderless gloves, or other similar alternatives will be readily accessible to those employees who are allergic to gloves normally provided. Allergy/

sensitivity to gloves provided must be documented by the OHC. Once documented, the supervisor will obtain the alternative recommended by the OHC.

(g) PPE will be cleaned, laundered, or disposed of by WRAMC at no cost to personnel. Laboratory coats that are used as PPE will be laundered by the hospital and not taken home for laundering. Personal clothing contaminated by blood or body fluids will be laundered by the hospital laundry at no cost to the employee. Supervisors will contact the contracting officer's representative for the Fabric Care Facility, Bldg. 606, at (301) 295-7630/31 to make arrangements for laundering personal clothing when contaminated.

(h) Supervisors will ensure repair or replacement of all reusable equipment as needed to maintain effectiveness.

(i) If PPE items are penetrated by blood or other potentially infectious materials, the item will be removed immediately or as soon as is feasible.

(j) All PPE will be removed prior to leaving the work area. PPE will not be worn into designated break areas.

(2) Gloves.

(a) Proper fitting latex gloves will be worn when it can be reasonably anticipated that the employee may have hand contact with blood, other body fluids, mucous membranes, and non-intact skin; when performing vascular access procedures; and when handling or touching contaminated items or surfaces.

(b) Examples of tasks where gloves will be worn are: phlebotomy, performing finger or heel sticks; during instrumental examination of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract; during invasive procedures; during all cleaning up of body fluids and decontaminating procedures; while handling and cleaning processing blood, body fluid and tissue specimens; when examining abraided or non-intact skin or patients with active bleeding; when emptying drains and foley-catheter bags; and when rendering emergency medical assistance to individuals with traumatic injury.

 

(c) Single use disposable latex gloves shall be replaced as soon as practical when contaminated or as soon as feasible if they are torn, punctured, or when their ability to function as a barrier is compromised.

(d) Gloves will be changed and hands washed between patients or during the care of a single patient when moving from a contaminated to a clean body site or from one contaminated site to another contaminated site.

(e) Hands will be washed as soon as possible after removal of gloves.

(f) Gloves shall be discarded in the appropriate container.

(g) Disposable gloves such as surgical or examination gloves will not be re-used.

(h) Sterile surgical gloves will be used for procedures involving contact with normally sterile areas of the body.

(i) Latex examination gloves will be used for procedures involving contact with mucous membranes, unless otherwise indicated, and for other patient care or diagnostic procedures that do not require the use of sterile gloves.

(j) Double gloving may be used for invasive surgical procedures where prolonged contact with blood may be expected.

(k) Used gloves will not be used to touch telephones, computers keyboards, charts, elevator buttons, or other uncontaminated surfaces.

(l) Personnel engaged in non-patient care services should use gloves appropriate to their type of work. Heavy duty utility gloves may be preferable for housekeeping personnel. Utility gloves may also be worn for cleaning instruments. These gloves may be washed and disinfected for reuse if the integrity of the glove is not compromised. If gloves are cracked, peeling, torn, or punctured, they will be discarded.

(m) Hypoallergenic gloves, low or no latex gloves, glove liners, powderless gloves or other alternatives will be provided to those workers who have documented allergies to the gloves normally provided. For employees involved in high risk procedures double gloving with an inner vinyl and outer latex glove may be considered.

(3) Masks, Eye Protection, and Face Shields.

(a) In general, whenever a mask is required, eye protection is required.

(b) Masks in combination with eye protection devices, such as goggles or glasses with solid side shields, or chin-length face shields shall be worn whenever splashes, spray, spatter, or droplets of blood or other body fluids may be generated and eye, nose, or mouth contamination can be reasonably anticipated.

(c) Prescription glasses may be used as protective eyewear as long as they are equipped with solid side shields that are permanently affixed or of the "add-on" type.

(d) Procedures requiring masks and eye protection include endotracheal intubation, bronchoscopy, GI endoscopy, gastric tube placement, dental procedures that splatter, autopsy, certain surgical and other invasive procedures, emptying containers of fluids, and irrigation’s.

(e) During microsurgery, when it is not reasonably anticipated that there would be any splattering, it would not constitute a violation for the surgeon, while observing surgery through a microscope, not to wear other eye protection.

(f) Masks shall be used once and discarded in the appropriate waste receptacle.

(g) Masks should not be worn around the neck or on top of the head.

(h) Masks must cover both the nose and mouth with no gaping at the sides.

(i) Reusable goggles and face shields will be washed with an approved detergent and water and disinfected with a 1:10 solution of bleach after each use.

 

(4) Gowns.

(a) Gowns, aprons, laboratory coats, or clinic jackets must be worn when there is the potential for reasonably anticipated soiling of clothing with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

(b) A cover garment is appropriate only if it does not permit blood or other body fluids to pass through to or reach the employee's work clothes, street clothes, or undergarments.

(c) Gowns impervious to fluid will be worn for surgical procedures and autopsies.

(d) A long-sleeved cover will be worn when arms are likely to become contaminated.

(e) Scrubs are not considered PPE and will be covered by appropriate gowns, aprons, or laboratory coats when splashes to skin or clothing are anticipated.

(f) A gown which is frequently ripped or falls apart under normal use would not be considered appropriate PPE.

(g) A cloth gown or disposable cover gown will not generally prevent gross liquid contamination from soaking through to the skin, but they are adequate protection for common bedside patient care procedures in situations when gross liquid/blood contamination is not likely.

(h) Examples of activities requiring gowns or aprons are: caring for a bleeding patient, changing the bed of an incontinent patient, lifting or moving a patient with draining wounds, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that may cause splattering or aerosolization, and autopsy.

(i) Gowns and aprons should be worn only once and then be removed and placed in the appropriate receptacle. These items will not be worn out of the work area.

(j) Cloth gowns and lab coats will be placed in the hospital laundry containers (or turned in as appropriate).

(k) Paper or plastic gowns/aprons will be discarded in the appropriate waste receptacle.

(5) Head and Foot Covers. Surgical caps or hoods and/or shoe covers or boots will be worn during surgical procedures, autopsies, or other situations when gross contamination can be reasonably anticipated. Shoe covers must be removed prior to leaving the work area to limit migration of contamination via shoes into other areas. Shoe covers must be removed prior to leaving the operating area. Wearing the shoe covers throughout the 4th floor is no longer acceptable.

(6) Resuscitative Devices. Seal-easy masks are available in each patient room and in other areas of the hospital where patients and staff are located for use during mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to prevent direct contact between the employee and the patient. Ambu-bags are at each bedside in critical care areas and on each crash cart in the hospital. The seal-easy masks are disposable and will be discarded after each use. Ambu-bags that are reusable will be bagged and sent to CMS for high-level disinfection or sterilization. Disposable ambu-bags are available.

d. Housekeeping.

(1) General housekeeping services in the Heaton Pavilion will be provided through the Environmental Services Branch of the Hospital Logistics Division.

(2) Each section in the hospital has specific cleaning procedures to be performed by each section’s personnel that are prescribed in the section’s Infection Control Standing Operating Procedures. Supervisors will ensure that the work area is maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.

(3) All cleaning supplies and disinfectants used at WRAMC will be approved by the Infection Control Committee.

(4) All equipment and environmental and working surfaces will be properly cleaned and disinfected after contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials and on a regular schedule with an appropriate disinfectant.

(5) Contaminated work surfaces will be cleaned and disinfected with an appropriate disinfectant after completion of procedures; immediately or as soon as feasible when surfaces are overtly contaminated or after any spill of blood or other body fluids; and at the end of the work shift if the surface may have become contaminated since the last cleaning. A phenolic disinfectant approved by the Infection Control Committee and used according to the manufacturer's directions will be used in the laboratory, and the operating rooms. The dialysis unit uses bleach for same purposes.

(6) Blood spills will be cleaned up immediately with a hospital approved disinfectant/detergent and water and the area disinfected with a 1:10 solution of household bleach or an approved phenolic disinfectant. Wards and clinics with infrequent or small spills may use Cavicide® cleaner disinfectant: Clean up the spill using Cavicide®, then spray Cavicide® on the area, wipe over it, and allow the area to dry.

(7) Protective coverings such as plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or imperviously-backed absorbent paper may be used to cover equipment and environmental surfaces. These shall be removed and replaced as soon as feasible when they become overtly contaminated and between patients.

(8) All bins, pails, cans, and similar waste receptacles intended for reuse which have a potential for becoming contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be inspected on a weekly basis and cleaned with an approved detergent and water, and decontaminated with a 1:10 solution of bleach or cleaned/decontaminated with a phenolic detergent/disinfectant immediately or as soon as possible after visible contamination and at least monthly.

(9) Reusable items contaminated with blood or other body fluids will be managed as follows:

(a) Items returned to CMS: Instruments and items returned to CMS in the red container soaking system should be placed into the enzymatic soak immediately or as soon as feasible after use. Items too large or not appropriate for red containers must be cleaned, rinsed, and placed in a plastic bag transport (the bag should be clear and labeled IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan).

(b) Items to remain in the clinical area: These should be cleaned with detergent and water and wiped down with 1:10 solution of bleach, phenolic disinfectant, or Cavicide®.

(10) Broken glassware which may be contaminated will not be picked up directly with the hands. It will be cleaned up using mechanical means, such as a brush and dust pan, tongs, or forceps.

(11) Routine Cleaning Schedule:

Location

Frequency

Cleaners And
Disinfectants Used

Patient room

Daily

Approved quaternary ammonium disinfectant

Patient bathroom

Daily

Approved quaternary ammonium disinfectant

Exam room

Daily; weekly if exam table is covered during use and procedures are not done.

Approved quaternary ammonium disinfectant

Procedure room

Between procedures

Approved quaternary ammonium disinfectant

Operating Room

Between cases

Approved phenolic disinfectant

Dialysis

Between patients

Approved phenolic disinfectant or approved detergent and 1:10 bleach solution

Laboratory

When contaminated and/or daily

Approved phenolic disinfectant

e. Regulated Medical Waste.

(1) Regulated Medical Waste (RMW), including sharps, will be disposed of IAW WRAMC Reg 40-2. This regulation should be available in every work area where RMW is generated.

(2) When moving containers of contaminated sharps from the area of use, the containers will be closed immediately prior to removal or replacement to prevent spillage or protrusion of contents during handling, storage, transport, or shipping. If leakage is possible, the container will be placed in a secondary container that is closable, constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage during handling, storage, transport, or shipping and labeled or red in color IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan.

(3) Other regulated medical waste is placed in red plastic bags that line containers or are on stands which are labeled IAW the Labels and Signs section of this plan. When 3/4 full, the bags are closed, the box is sealed. If outside contamination of the box occurs, the waste is placed in a second bag inside another labeled box.

(4) Appropriate PPE will be used when handling containers of RMW as described in the Personal Protective Equipment section.

f. Laundry.

(1) Clean and soiled linen shall be kept segregated at all

times.

(2) All soiled linen will be handled using CDC Standard Precautions. Personnel handling linen soiled with blood or other body fluids will use appropriate PPE as described in the Personal Protective Equipment section.

(3) Soiled linen will not be sorted or rinsed in patient

care areas.

(4) Soiled linen will be collected in the hospital-approved laundry bags at the location where it was used. If linen is excessively wet, it should be placed in an impervious laundry bag.

(5) Laundry from WRAMC is sent to the Fabric Care Facility at Forest Glenn Annex for cleaning.

(6) Sharps containers will be available in linen sorting area.

12. Hepatitis B Vaccination, Post-Exposure Evaluation And Follow-up:

a. Hepatitis B Vaccine Immunization Program.

(1) The Department of Defense (DOD) hepatitis B vaccination policy was established in October 1996 for DOD employees, students, volunteers and contract employees who provide care within DOD medical and dental treatment facilities. The policy is in Appendix B.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.1030, the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard states that "the employer shall make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series to all employees who have occupational exposure". Occupational exposure is defined as "reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties".

(3) Based on the guidelines detailed above, WRAMC has established the policy for implementation of the hepatitis B vaccine immunization program which is contained in Appendix B. Each employee to which this policy applies will be given the hepatitis B vaccination after receiving training as detailed in the Information and Training section of this regulation and within 10 working days of initial assignment unless exempt as listed above.

(4) Pre-vaccination screening to determine immunity to the hepatitis B virus will be performed upon request but is not a prerequisite for receiving the hepatitis B vaccination.

(5) The vaccination will be provided at no cost to DOD employees and any other personnel when included in a written agreement/contract.

(6) The Hepatitis B vaccine Immunization program consists of a series of three inoculations over a six month period. The OHC in conjunction with Allergy/Immunization Clinic is responsible for setting up and operating the vaccination program. Vaccinations are performed under the supervision of a licensed physician or other health care professional. Hepatitis B vaccine is administered IAW United States Public Health Service recommendations. If at a future date a routine booster of hepatitis B vaccine is recommended, it will be made available to employees.

(7) Employees will be evaluated by the OHC for initiation of the hepatitis B vaccination series at the time of employment. During the evaluation, the OHN will provide the employee with information on the hepatitis B vaccine. In accordance with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, within 15 days of the completion of the evaluation, the OHN will provide the employee with a provider’s written opinion, on WRAMC Overprint 611 (Health Care Provider’s Written Opinion for Hepatitis B Vaccination) of whether hepatitis B vaccination is indicated for the employee. A copy of the form will be placed in the employee’s medical record and a copy will be sent to the employee’s supervisor.

(8) A record of the vaccination status of all civilian employees will be maintained by the OHC. This database will be reviewed and updated annually on all employees through the Birth Month Annual Review (BMAR), and Soldier Readiness Processing(SRP) program. Any currently employed civilian employee hired prior to January 1, 1997, having declined to be vaccinated will have a signed declination statement WRAMC Overprint 602, (Hepatitis B Vaccination Declination) on file IAW 29 CFR 1910.1030. A notation will be made if employee declines to sign the declination form. This statement will be maintained in the employee’s medical record. Employees who initially decline the hepatitis B vaccination can receive the vaccine at a later date upon request.

(9) In addition to hepatitis B vaccination status screening, the OHC will screen employees on initial employment and annually thereafter for latex sensitivity. Those employees who have possible sensitivity to latex will be referred to the Allergy and/or Dermatology Clinic for further evaluation and will be placed on low or no latex exposure precautions.

b. Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-up.

(1) General. Needlesticks, cuts and splashes to the eye or mouth involving blood or other potentially infectious materials are serious occurrences. Because they may result in exposure to bloodborne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, they must be handled thoughtfully and expeditiously.

(2) Self aid. Immediately after an exposure incident, the employee should administer self aid. Self aid should be completed prior to all other activities.

(a) Needlesticks. Allow the area to bleed freely. Wash the area with a bacterial solution or at a minimum with soap and water.

(b) Non-intact skin exposure. Wash the area with a bacteriocidal solution or soap and water.

(c) Mucous membrane exposure, including the eyes. Flush the affected area with copious amounts of water.

(3) Immediate Actions.

(a) After self aid, the employee will immediately notify the immediate supervisor that a BBP exposure has occurred.

(b) The supervisor will ensure that the injured employee reports immediately to the ER for initial evaluation and treatment and to the OHC for follow-up. Evaluations must be initiated immediately so that the post-exposure prophylaxis may be administered as soon as possible after the exposure.

(For high risk HIV exposure, the CDC recommends anti- retroviral prophylaxis within the first one to two hours following exposure.)

(c) WRAMC has the right to evaluate employees who are injured on the job and are filing a Form CA-1 Federal Employee’s Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of Pay/Compensation or Form CA-2 Notice of Occupational Disease and Claim of Compensation. Employees with suspected BBP exposure should report to the ER for evaluation as soon as possible after the exposure incident. After evaluation by the ER, the employee has the right to choose a civilian physician for treatment or to accept treatment by WRAMC. If the employee has initiated a CA-1/CA-2 claim and desires treatment by a private physician, the employee may obtain the necessary Department of Labor forms from the WRAMC FECA office requesting private physician treatment.

(4) Identification of Source.

(a) The immediate supervisor will identify the source of the exposure, if possible.

(b) If the source is available, the supervisor will explain the importance of assisting the injured employee by agreeing to be evaluated for potential bloodborne pathogens.

(c) If the source is an outpatient who is still in the clinic, he/she will be requested to accompany the employee and supervisor to the ER for evaluation.

(d) If the source is an ambulatory surgery patient or an outpatient who has already left the clinic, the supervisor will contact the source’s physician and inform the physician that he/she must contact the ER to coordinate evaluation of the source.

(e) If the source is an inpatient, the ER will contact the source’s physician, physician coverage, or ward head nurse to coordinate evaluation of the source.

(5) Initial Evaluation and Treatment of Employee and Source.

(a) The ER will immediately triage the employee and source if present and initiate evaluation and treatment IAW the algorithm at Appendix C.

(b) The ER will document the evaluation on WRAMC Overprint 594 (Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure) (see Appendix C) and WRAMC Form 2072 (WRAMC Uniform Needlestick, Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Report.)

(c) Evaluation of the source will be completed by the source’s physician or the ER and documented on WRAMC Overprint 593 (Blood and Body Fluid Exposure: Risk Assessment of Known Source) (see Appendix C). The risk assessment of the source will be used by the ER to determine the testing and treatment required by the employee.

(d) The ER will provide the injured employee with a copy of the Information Sheet for Patients Who Have Sustained a Needlestick Injury or Other Body Fluid Exposure (See Appendix C)and review contents with the employee.

(e) Testing for active duty military is mandatory. Prior to obtaining blood samples for HIV and other testing, a civilian employee or civilian source must be counseled by a health care provider. Consent for HIV testing for civilians must be documented in their medical record on WRAMC Form 2076 (Informed Consent and Agreement to HIV Testing). If the civilian employee or source refuses to be tested, this fact must be documented on WRAMC Form 2076. If the employee consents to baseline blood collection but does not give consent at that time for HIV serologic testing, the sample shall be preserved for at least 90 days. If within 90 days of the exposure incident the employee elects to have the baseline sample tested, he/she will notify the OHC. The OHC will then notify the Laboratory to test the blood sample as soon as possible.

(f) If the source is known to be HIV positive or is determined to be high risk for being HIV positive at the time of the exposure, the employee shall be counseled and given the option of anti-retroviral prophylaxis. The ER will coordinate with the Infectious Disease Service for counseling and initiation of treatment.

(g) The ER will send the injured employee to the OHC immediately (next duty day if evening, holiday or weekend) after evaluation and treatment in the ER for completion of OSHA regulated documentation. The ER will place the original of WRAMC Overprint 594, WRAMC Overprint 593, WRAMC Form 2072 and WRAMC Form 2076(for civilian employees) in the OHC box in the ER. The ER will keep the pink copy of the WRAMC Overprint 594 and 593 and give the yellow copy of WRAMC Overprint 594 to the employees (See Appendix C).

(h) If a civilian employee chooses to be treated by a private Health-care professional after the initial evaluation, the OHC will forward the following documentation: description of the exposure incident; results of the source’s risk assessment and blood testing, if available; and all medical records relevant to the evaluation and treatment of the employee including vaccination status.

(i) Contractors, students and volunteers will seek follow-up care from the source of medical care identified in their contract or agreement. The contracting company/volunteer agency/school will be provided a letter informing them of the exposure incident.

(6) Follow-up of Employees

(a) The OHC will provide follow-up counseling, testing and

prophylaxis for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV IAW CDC guidelines and the protocol in Appendix C. Documentation of test results will be made on WRAMC Overprint 600 (Results of Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Incident Evaluation) and placed in the employee’s medical record. A copy will be maintained in the OHC. If employee declines to participate in the recommended follow-up and tests, this will be documented in the medical record.

(b) IAW the BBP Standard, the OHC will ensure that the employee has been informed of the results of their testing and the results of the source’s testing and acting as the employee’s representative, will provide the employee with the Healthcare Professional’s Written Opinion within 15 days of the completion of the evaluation with emphasis on confidentiality, the written opinion will be limited to the following: a statement that the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation; and a statement that the employee has been told about any medical conditions resulting from the exposure incident which require further evaluation or treatment. All other findings or diagnoses will remain confidential and will not be included in the written report. The opinion will be documented on WRAMC Overprint 601 (Healthcare Provider’s Written Opinion for Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure) by the OHC. The original form will be given to the employee, a copy will be sent to the employee’s supervisor, a copy will be placed in the employee’s medical record, and a copy will be filed in the OHC.

(c) In order to make sure that employees receive the standard of care and timely treatment if exposed to a bloodborne pathogen, a post-exposure evaluation and follow-up checklist will be completed by the OHC. QA review of the checklist will verify that all the steps in the process have been completed.

(7) Reporting and Investigation of BBP Incidents

(a) The supervisor will immediately investigate the

circumstances surrounding the exposure incident. The supervisor will initiate the following forms: WRAMC Form 1332, Supervisors Report of Occupational Accident which will be forwarded to the Safety Office; DA Form 1811 (Risk Management/Quality Improvement Report) which will be forwarded to the Quality Improvement Office. For civilian employees, the supervisor will instruct the employees where to obtain a DOL Form CA-1 (Notification of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of Pay/Compensation), or CA-2 Notice of Occupational Disease and Claim for Compensation. The CA-1/CA-2 forms will be forwarded to the WRAMC FECA office by the supervisor with a copy to the Safety Office.

(b) The Safety Office will investigate every exposure incident that occurs in this facility. This investigation involves gathering information. The Safety Office will document all recordable exposure incidents on the OSHA 200 Log.

(c) The OHC will collect data on the types and circumstances of BBP incidents and provide the data to the Infection Control Service which will analyze the data to identify trends and propose preventive measures.

(8) BBP Incident Evaluation Forms. All WRAMC forms referenced in this regulation can be obtained through WRAMC publication supply channels.

c. Medical Recordkeeping

(1) The OHC will establish and maintain an accurate record for each civilian employee with occupational exposure, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020.

(2) Active duty employees’ personal health record will also serve as their record for occupational exposure. This record will be maintained by Patient Administration Directorate.

(3) Each record will contain at least the following information:

(a) Name of the employee.

(b) Social security number of the employee.

(c) Documentation of the employee's hepatitis B vaccination status and dates of any vaccinations.

(d) Medical records relative to the employee's ability to receive vaccination.

(e) Results of the examinations, medical testing, counseling and follow-up procedures which took place as a result of an employee's exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

(f) A copy of the information provided to the consulting

healthcare professional as a result of any exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

(g) Results of evaluations of any reported illnesses

related to exposure incidents.

(4) As with all medical information, the information in these

medical records is confidential and will not be disclosed or reported to anyone without the employee's written consent, except as required by regulation or law.

(5) Medical records will be maintained at the medical

treatment facility during the time of employment and are kept permanently at the National Records Center after the civilian employee/active duty member retires or leaves federal/military service.

13. Labels And Signs:

a. The following items will be labeled:

(1) Containers for RMW.

(2) Refrigerators/freezers containing blood or other potentially infectious materials.

(3) The clear sharps container liners and the wall cabinets for the sharps containers.

(4) Containers used to store, transport, or ship blood and other potentially infectious materials outside of the facility (Individual specimen containers do not require a label nor do the clear plastic sealed bags used to transport specimens within the hospital).

(5) Contaminated equipment.

b. Labels will be fluorescent orange or orange-red with letters or symbols in a contrasting color. The label will include the following legend:

c. Labels used to identify contaminated equipment will have a space for indicating which portion of the equipment is contaminated and, if known the containment.

d. RMW storage sites will remain locked and labeled.

14. Information And Training:

(a) General.

(1) All employees with occupational exposure as

identified in Appendix B will participate in initial training, annual training within one year of their previous initial or annual training, and training whenever changes in procedures or tasks occur which may affect occupational exposure.

(2) Trainers must be knowledgeable in the subject.

(3) Training must be appropriate in content, language, and vocabulary to the educational, literacy, and language background of the employees.

(4) The Quality Improvement Office will coordinate the initial and annual training at WRAMC as described below to meet the provisions of the BBP Standard.

b. Initial Training.

(1) All employees with occupational exposure as identified in the Exposure Determination section of this plan will participate in orientation prior to being placed in positions where occupational exposure may take place. Infection Control Service provides this orientation to inprocessing personnel during the Command Newcomer's Orientation. Supervisors in each work area must provide orientation to the use and location of engineering controls, PPE, cleaning and disinfection supplies, RMW containers, laundry bags, and this BBPECP in that area.

(2) Individuals who start work which may expose them to bloodborne pathogens prior to attending Command Orientation must be thoroughly oriented to this plan by the supervisors in their work area.

c. Annual Training.

(1) All employees with occupational exposure as identified in the exposure determination section of this plan will participate in annual training within one year of their previous training and when changes in procedures or tasks occur which may affect occupational exposure.

(2) It is the responsibility of department/service chiefs to ensure annual training for all personnel is obtained. Annual refresher training will be done through the WRAMC Birth Month Annual Review (BMAR) program.

(3) Supervisors in each work area are responsible for providing training in new tasks or procedures and new engineering controls specific to that work area.

d. Training Program Elements and Requirements. The following elements are required:

(1) An accessible copy of the regulatory text of the BBP Standard and an explanation of its contents.

(2) A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of bloodborne diseases.

(3) An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens.

(4) An explanation of the exposure control plan and the means by which the employee can obtain a copy of the written plan.

(5) An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and other activities that may involve exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials.

(6) An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will prevent or reduce exposure including appropriate engineering controls, work practices, and PPE.

(7) Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination and disposal of PPE.

(8) An explanation of the basis for selection of PPE.

(9) Information on the hepatitis B vaccine, including its efficacy, safety, method of administration, the benefits of being vaccinated, and that the vaccine and vaccination will be offered free of charge.

(10) Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to contact in an emergency involving blood or other potentially infectious materials.

(11) An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident occurs, including the method of reporting the incident and the medical follow-up that will be made available IAW these regulations.

(12) Information on the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up that the employer is required to provide for the employee following an exposure incident.

(13) An explanation of the signs and labels and/or color coding in use.

(14) An opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the person conducting the training sessions.

e. Training Records.

(1) Written training records will be kept by the Infection Control Service for three years from the date of training. The records will include the date of the session, the contents or a summary of the training, the names and qualifications of persons conducting the training, and the names and job titles of all persons attending the training sessions.

(2) The NESD Training Database Manager will maintain a computerized training database to fulfill core competency documentation as required by JCAHO.

(3) All employee records will be made available to the employee in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records. All employee records shall be made available to the Assistant Secretary of labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health upon request.

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Appendix A:

References

Required Publications

AR 40-66, Medical Record Administration, 20 July 1992(Cited in para 7n(11))

WRAMC Reg 40-2, Waste Disposal, 19 January 1997(Cited in para 11e(1))

Related Publications

Hepatitis B Immunization Policy for Department of Defense Medical and Dental Personnel, 23 October 1996

WRAMC PAM 40-64, Occupational Health Program, 22 July 1996

U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR part 1910.1030, Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens; Final Rule. Federal Register, 6 Dec 91; 56: 64004-64182.

CDC Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Health-Care Worker Exposure to HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis. MMWR 1998;47 (No-RR-7)

CDC. Immunization of Health-care Workers- Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HCPAC). MMWR 1997; 46(No.RR-18)

CDC Recommendations for Health-care Workers after Occupational Exposure to Hepatitis C Viruses. MMWR 1997; 46:603-6

CDC Guidelines for use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-infected Adults and Adolescents, MMWR, 1997; 46 (No. RR-5) 43-82

CDC Guidelines for Infection Control in Health Care Personnel, 1998, AJIC Vol 26 No.3, Jun 98: 289-354

Garner JS, Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1996; 17:53-80.

Prescribed Forms

WRAMC Overprint xx, Healthcare Provider’s Written Opinion for Hepatitis B Vaccination. (Prescribed in para 12a(6))

WRAMC Overprint 602, Hepatitis B Vaccination Declination. (Prescribed in para 12a(7))

WRAMC Overprint 594, Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure. (Prescribed in paras 12b(5)(b), 12b(5)(g), and Appendix C)

WRAMC Form 2072, WRAMC Uniform Needlestick, Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Report. (Prescribed in para 12b(5(b)(g). and Appendix C)

WRAMC Overprint 593, Addendum Sheet, Blood and Body Fluid Exposure: Patient, Risk Assessment of Known Source (Prescribed in paras 12b (5)(c), 12b(5)(g), and Appendix C))

WRAMC Form 2076, Informed Consent and Agreement to HIV Testing (Prescribed in para 12b (5)(e),12b(5)(g), and Appendix C))

WRAMC Overprint 600, Results of Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Incident Evaluation (Prescribed in para 12b(6)(a))

WRAMC Overprint 601, Healthcare Providers Written Opinion for Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure (Prescribed in para 12b(6)(b))

Referenced Forms

DOL Form CA-1, Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for COP/Compensation

DOL Form CA-16, Authorization for Examination and/or Treatment

WRAMC Form 1332, Supervisors Report of Occupational Accident

WRAMC Form 1811, Risk Management/Quality Improvement Report

Appendix B:

Hepatitis B Vaccine Immunization Policy and Exposure Determination

 

1. WRAMC Hepatitis B vaccine Immunization Policy

Permanent Party Military

Reserve Component & Other Temporary Military

Civilian Employees

Contractors/
Volunteers/Students

Required for all non-immune service members who hold qualifications or assignments in medical or dental fields or have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens*.

Required for all non-immune service members who hold qualifications or assignments in medical and dental career fields or have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens*

Required for all non-immune personnel with duties involving direct patient contact who are hired or began activity on or after

1 Jan 97.

Required to be offered to all personnel identified as having occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens* and strongly encouraged for currently employed personnel with duties involving direct patient contact. Statement of declination must be on file.

 

Required for all non-immune personnel with duties involving direct patient contact who began their activity on or after 1 Jan 97.

Required for all personnel identified as having occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens*.

 

 

* Occupational exposure is defined as reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1030, Bloodborne Pathogen Standard.

Personnel who have any of the following three conditions are exempt form the hepatitis B immunization requirement: (1) Known positive hepatitis B surface antigen, (2) Past history of recovery from hepatitis B, with known positive hepatitis B surface antibody, (3) Disease or medical conditions that would make hepatitis B immunization inadvisable in the judgement of the person’s physician.

2. Department of Defense Hepatitis B Immunization Policy:

Hepatitis B Immunization Policy for Department of Defense Medical and Dental Personnel prescribes interim policy for hepatitis B immunization of medical and dental personnel, pending issuance of a revision of Department of Defense Instruction 6205.2, Immunization Requirements, dated October 9, 1986.

All Service members who hold qualification or assignment in medical or dental career fields shall be required to complete a series of three immunization against hepatitis B, or to show evidence of prior completion of three immunizations.

There is an requirement to screen service members by testing for hepatitis B surface antigen or antibody in order to implement this policy. Existing hepatitis B serologic information documented In health records may permit exemption from immunization, or may require evaluation of clinical privileging, as described below.

Service members who have any of the three conditions below are exempt from the immunization requirements:

a. Known positive serum hepatitis B surface antigen. Such personnel who are clinically privileged shall have documentation at each renewal of privileging that their Military Treatment Facility Credentials Committee has evaluated their potential for transmitting hepatitis B during invasive procedures. In delineating privileges, the privileging authority shall fully consider the clinical stress of each individual, based on his or her specific situation and scope of practice. It is Department of Defense policy that Credentials Committees shall recommend curtailment of the privileges of providers who are at high risk for administering hepatitis B, as shown by positive serum hepatitis B E antigen or positive serum hepatitis B DNA, in such invasive procedures as cardiac surgery. In situations where a question of defining a provider’s scope of privileges arises,

Credentials Committees shall seek expert assistance from the facility’s parent Service Consultant in Preventive Medicine. Limitation of clinical privileges under this policy is medical rather than administrative, and shall not be considered as an adverse action against the individual.

b. A past history of recovery from hepatitis B, with known positive serum antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen. There is no requirement for Credentials Committee evaluation of this status.

c. A disease or medical condition that would make hepatitis B Immunization inadvisable in the judgement of the service member’s physician. Such a condition shall be adequately documented in the individual’s medical record.

The same requirement, with the same provisions and exemptions, shall apply to all Department of Defense civilian personnel, including trainees, volunteers, and other temporary staff, with duties involving direct patient contact who are hired or begin activity on or after January 1, 1997. Currently employed civilian personnel involved in direct patient contact are strongly encouraged to have hepatitis B immunization. The same requirement, with the same provisions and exemptions, shall be incorporated into contracts for civilian medical personnel who provide care within Department of Defense medical and dental treatment facilities.

Original policy signed by Stephen C. Joseph, M.D., M.P.H. on 23 October 1995.

3. Exposure Determination

a. Series and General Position Title for Civilian Employees Exposed per the DoD Hepatitis B Immunization Policy and 29 CFR 1910.1030 with direct patient contact:

 

Job Series

Job Titles Civilians Exposed

0602

Medical Officer/Consultant

0603

Physician's Assistant

0610

Registered Nurse

0620

Practical Nurse

0621

Nursing Assistant

0625

Autopsy Assistant

0631

Occupational Therapist

0633

Physical Therapist

0636

Physical Therapy Assistant

0640

Medical/Surgical/Health Technician

0642

Nuclear Medicine Technician

0644

Medical Technologist

0645

Medical Technician

0647

Diagnostic Radiologic Technologist

0648

Ther Radl Technologist

0651

Respiratory Therapist

0657

Diagnostic Radiologic Technologist

0667

Orthotist/Prosthetist

0668

Podiatrist

0680

Dentist

0682

Dental Hygienist

0699

Ultrasound Diognostic Technician

 

1911

Gen Nur

b. Series and General Position Title for Civilian Employees Exposed per 29 CFR 1910.1030 without direct patient contact:

 

Job Series

Job Titles Civilians Exposed

0081

Firefighter (Structural)

0083

Police Officer

0401

Biologist/Histologist

0403

Microbiologist

0404

Biological Laboratory Technician

0413

Research Physiologist

0415

Toxicologist

0646

Histopathology Technician

0673

Hospital Housekeeping Officer

3511

Laboratory Worker

3566

Custodial Worker

7304

Laundry Worker

 

c. Series and General Position Title for Civilian Employees Sometimes Exposed per 29 CFR 1910.1030 with/without direct patient contact

 

Job Series

Job Titles Civilians Sometimes Exposed

0030

Sports Specialist

0189

Recreation Assistant

0649

Medical Instrument Tech

0660

Pharmacist

0661

Pharmacy Technician

0665

Speech Pathologist/Audiologist

0690

Industrial Hygienist

0858

Biomed Engineer

1701

Child Development Assistant Director

1702

Child Development Program Assistant

4206

Plumber

7601

Patient Transporter

8485

Core/Psych Tech

 

d. Tasks and procedures in which occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens sometimes occur (these tasks and procedures are performed by employees in the job classifications shown in paragraph 3 above):

(1). Some Sports Specialists, Recreation Assistants and Child Development Director and Assistants are designated First Aid responders and may become exposed in the event of performing CPR or initial wound care.

(2). Some Patient Transporters and Psychiatric Technicians working in inpatient settings may have to assist in restraining patients and thereby become exposed.

(3). Some Histologists, Histopathology Technicians, Microbiologists, Bio Lab Technicians, Toxicologists, Laboratory Workers and Research Physiologists, though not exposed to direct patient contact, may work with unfixed human secretions or tissues in a laboratory at this institution and may become exposed while processing specimens in case of accidental breakage of specimen containers.

(4). Some Pharmacists, Pharmacy Technicians, Speech Pathologists and Audiologists have direct inpatient patient contact and may become exposed through improperly disposed of needles and contaminated linen.

(5). Some laundry workers, Medical Instrument Technicians, Biomedical Engineers, Hospital Housekeeping Officers and Custodial Workers service or remove inappropriately cleaned/decontaminated linen and equipment or encounter sharps not properly disposed of, and may thereby become exposed to BBP.

(6). Some Plumbers may become exposed while servicing operating room or pathology department sinks containing retained body fluids or tissues.

(7). Some Industrial Hygienists are assigned to the hospital and may participate in the investigation of an emergency of contamination with human blood products and thereby become exposed.

e. MOS and General Position Title for Military Personnel Exposed:

(1). Officers:

MOS Series

MOS Titles Officers Exposed

60 Series

Medical Corps

61 Series

Medical Corps

63 Series

Dental Corps

64 Series

Veterinary Corps

65 Series

Army Medical Specialist Corps

66 Series

Army Nurse Corps

67 Series

Medical Service Corps

(2). Enlisted:

MOS Series

MOS Titles Enlisted Exposed

18D

Special Operations Medical Sergeant

76J

Medical Supply Specialist

91 Series

Medical

f. MOS and General Position Title for Military Personnel Somtimes Exposed :

(1) Officers

MOS Series

MOS Titles Military Sometimes Exposed

31A

Military Police Officer

(2) Enlisted:

MOS Series

MOS Titles Military Sometimes Exposed

35U

Biomedical Equipment Specialist

51K

Plumber

51M

Firefighter

95B

Military Police/NCO

95C

Corrections NCO

g. Tasks and procedures in which occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens sometimes occur (these tasks and procedures are performed by employees in the job classifications shown in paragraph 5. above):

(1). Military Police, Firefighters and corrections officers are designated first responders and may become exposed during first aid and rescue operations when providing CPR or providing initial wound care.

(2). Plumbers may become exposed when servicing operating room or pathology department sinks containing retained body fluids or tissues.

(3). Biomedical equipment specialists may become exposed if servicing improperly cleaned and disinfected medical equipment.

h. The Occupational Health Service and Infection Control Service will work with department managers and supervisors to revise and update these lists as tasks, procedures, and classifications change.

 

Appendix C, Change 1, 12 August 2000:

(Entire Protocol Has Been Revised)
EMERGENCY MEDICINE SERVICE PROTOCOL FOR BLOOD/BODY FLUID EXPOSURE EVALUATION

Contents

1. All Patients

C-1

2. Bloodwork for All Patients

a. Patient
b. Source

C-2
C-2

3. Specific Exposures

a. HIV
b. Hepatitis C
c. Hepatitis B
(1) Source Known positive
(2) Source High Risk But Not Known Positive
d. Source Unknown



C-2
C-6
C-6
C-6
C-6
C-7

4. FOLLOW-UP

C-8

5. REQUIRED FORMS FOR BBP EXPOSURE EVALUATION

C-9

6. SAMPLE OF A COMPLETED WRAMC OP 594

Figure C-1



1. ALL PATIENTS

a. Complete

(1) WRAMC Overprint 594, (Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)

(2) WRAMC Overprint 2072, (WRAMC Uniform Needlestick, Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)

b. Wound care as needed

c. Tetanus prophylaxis as needed.

d. Provide a copy of Information Sheet For Patients Who Have a Needlestick Injury or Body Fluid Exposure (See Figure 3) and counsel as needed for HIV, hepatitis B and/or hepatitis C.

e. Hepatitis B Vaccinated Patients: Check Hep B Surface Antibody(CHCS). If not previously documented positive, continue vaccination series if 3 doses not completed.

f. Hepatitis B Unvaccinated Patients: Refer to Allergy/Immunization Clinic for vaccination if at risk for future blood and body fluid exposure (all health care workers).

g. Have the source's physician fill out WRAMC Overprint 593 (Risk Assessment of Known Source) h. See Paragraph 4 for follow-up instructions.

2. BLOODWORK ALL CASES (Labs listed below based on CHCS listings):

a. PATIENT, Order( CHCS lab order set - BBPEXP-Saplan):

(1) Hep B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, Check CHCS)

(2) Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody(Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

(3) Hepatitis C Antibody

(4) P3 (Liver Functions Tests)

(5) Additional blood work if indicated below.

b. SOURCE (Omit any known positives), Order (CHCS lab order set BBPEXP-SAPLAN - Source):

(1) Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

(2) Hepatitis B Surface antigen(If known positive, only Hepatitis B e Antigen)

(3) Hepatitis C Antibody

(4) P3 (Liver Function Tests)

(5) Additional bloodwork if indicated below.

3. SPECIFIC EXPOSURES: Bloodwork, Treatment, and Follow-up

a. Human Immunodeficiency Virus If Source Is Known HIV Positive Or Is High Risk (per WRAMC OP 593):

(1) Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076. If consent denied, indicate on the blood tube that specimen should be stored for 90 days.)

(2) Immediate Infectious Disease (ID) Service consult for counseling and to evaluate for possible post-exposure prophylaxis as below.

(3) Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP): Follow the Guidelines for management of Occupational Exposure to HIV (Excerpted from MMWR. Vol. 47/No. RR-7 May 15, 1998) as below. (Refer to table in the next page)

C - 4

Determining the need for HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after an occupational exposure*

 

STEP : Determine the Exposure Code (EC)

 

C - 5

Determining the need for HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after an occupational exposure* - continued

STEP 2: Determine the HIV Status Code (HIV SC)

b. HEPATITIS C, If Source Is Known Positive Or is High Risk For Hepatitis C (per WRAMC OP 593):

(1) Patient bloodwork: order Hepatitis C Antibody and P3 (LFTs).

(2) Infectious Disease Service follow-up (routine). Ask patient to bring copy of Emergency Department (ED) evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

c. HEPATITIS B:

(1) If Source is Known Positive For Hepatitis B (per WRAMC OP 593).

(a) For Vaccinated patient, order Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, Check CHCS).

(b) For Unvaccinated patient(or history of negative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody titer):

(i) Administer Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin 0.06 ml/kg I.M. in the ED.

(ii) Patient bloodwork, order

§         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody

§         Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

§         P3 (LFTs)


(iii) Source bloodwork, order

§         Hepatitis B e Antigen


(iv) Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic to initiate vaccination as soon as possible.

(v) ID Service follow-up, 48-72 hours (emphasize importance). Ask patient to bring copy of ER evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

(2) If Source Is High Risk But NOT KNOWN Positive for Hepatitis B per WRAMC OP 593):

(a) For Vaccinated patient.

(i) Patient bloodwork, order: hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, check CHCS)

(ii) Source bloodwork, order:

§         Chronic hepatitis Panel

§         Hepatitis B e Antigen (If known positive for Hepatitis B)

§         P3 ( LFTs)

(b) For Unvaccinated patient(or history of negative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody titer):

(i) Administer HBIG 0.06ml/kg I.M. in ED

(ii) Patient bloodwork, order

§         Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

§         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody

§         P3 (LFTs)

(iii) Source bloodwork, order

§         Chronic Hepatitis panel

§         P3 (LFTs)


(iv) Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic to initiate Hepatitis B vaccination ASAP.

(v) Infectious Disease Service follow-up, 48-72 hours (emphasize importance). Ask patient to bring copy of ED evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

d. SOURCE UNKNOWN:

(1) Patient bloodwork, order

§         Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

§         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, check CHCS)

§         Hepatitis C Antibody

§         P3 (LFTs)

(2) Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic, if applicable to complete/initiate Hepatitis B vaccination ASAP.

4. FOLLOW-UP:

a. Active Duty and Civilian Employees.

(1) All patients should be given a same day consult to OHC for follow-up tracking (next duty day if evenings, weekends, or holidays). Additional follow-up by ID Service if given Post-exposure Prophylaxis.

(2) Place the original of the WRAMC OP 594, OP 593 (Risk Assessment Sheet), and WRAMC Form 1072 and WRAMC Form 1076(for civilians) in the OHC box in the ED.

b. Contract Employees, Volunteers and Students:

(1) Contract employees, volunteers and students will be given the yellow copy of WRAMC OP 594.

(2) The OHC will be responsible for giving the results of initial bloodwork and WRAMC Overprint 600 to the employee, volunteer or student.

(3) Contract employees, volunteers and students will seek follow-up care from the source of medical care identified in their contract agreement with the forms given to them by the ED and the OHC.

5. REQUIRED FORMS FOR BBP EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND THEIR DISPOSITION

 

Form

Purpose

Completed BY

Disposition

 

 

 

Employees – Active Duty/Civilian

Contract/Students/
Volunteers/DOD Beneficiary

 

 

WRAMC OVERPRINT 594

(Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)*

 

Document evaluation of patient

ER Physician see Figure 1

Original OHC for Medical record

Pink Copy to ER

Yellow Copy to patient

 

Original to OHC for patient’s MD

Pink Copy to ER

Yellow Copy to OHC for patient

 

 

WRAMC OVERPRINT 593 (Blood & Body Fluid Exposure: Patient, Risk Assessment of Known Source)*

Document risk assessment of source for use in determining treatment of patient

Physician of source See Figure 2

Original to OHC

Pink Copy to ER

 

Original to OHC

Pink Copy to ER

 

 

WRAMC Form 2072 (WRAMC Uniform Needlestick Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Report)*

Collect information on bloodborne pathogen exposure

Patient

Original to OHC for Medical Record

 

Original to OHC

 

WRAMC Form 2076 (Informed Consent & Agreement to HIV Testing)*#

For non-active duty patients, to document informed consent and agreement to HIV testing

Patient

Original to OHC for Medical Record
Copy to ER

Original to OHC

Copy to ER

 

 

WRAMC OVERPRINT 601 (Healthcare Provider's Opinion for Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure)#

Document that patient has been informed of the results of evaluation

OHC Staff and patient

Original to OHC for Medical Record
Pink Copy to ER
Yellow Copy to patient

 

Not applicable

 

WRAMC OVERPRINT 600 (Results of Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Incident Evaluation)#

Summary of exposure incident and evaluation

OHC Staff

Original for OHC for Medical Record
Copy to OHC

 

Original for patient's MD Copy to OHC

 

WRAMC Form 1332 (Supervisor's Report of Occupational Accident)

Document circumstances and result of accident

Supervisor and employee

Original for Safety Office
Copy for supervisor and employee

Original for Safety Office

Copy for supervisor and employee

 

 

WRAMC Form 1811

Risk Management/Quality Improvement Report)

 

Information on the occurrence of an accident or event not consistent with normal patient care and the outcome

Supervisor and employee

Original and 2 to Quality Improvement Office

 

Original and 2 to Quality Improvement Office

 

 

ALL Forms available in Forms & Pubs and : * = ER # = OHC

 

Information Sheet for Patients Who Have Sustained a Needlestick Injury or Other Body Fluid Exposure

Patients who have sustained a needlestick or similar type of exposure to blood or body fluids are at possible risk for development of several transmissible diseases, the most important of which are: HIV (human immunodeficiency virus or AIDS), hepatitis B and hepatitis C. More information about each of these diseases appears below.

I. HIV (AIDS):

While the risk is very low, it is not zero. HIV infection has been reported after occupational exposures to HIV-infected blood through needlesticks or cuts; splashes in the eyes, nose, or mouth; and skin contact.

Exposures from needlesticks or cuts cause most infections. The average risk of HIV infection after a needlestick/cut exposure to HIV-infected blood is 0.3% (i.e., three-tenths of one percent, or about 1 in 300). Stated another way, 99.7% of needlestick/cut exposures do not lead to infection.

The risk after exposure of the eye, nose, or mouth to HIV-infected blood is estimated to be, on average, 0.1% (1 in 1,000).

The risk after exposure of the skin to HIV-infected blood is estimated to be less than 0.1%. A small amount of blood on intact skin probably poses no risk at all. There have been no cases of HIV transmission documented due to an exposure involving a small amount of blood intact skin. The risk may be higher if the skin is damaged (e.g., by a recent cut) or if the contact involves a large area of skin or is prolonged.

If the source of the needlestick is unknown or not at risk for HIV then the chance that the source is positive is very low.

If you should develop fever, chills, muscle aches, or severe headache during the next six months, it is important that you return for a re-evaluation, since there is a possibility that these nonspecific symptoms could be related to HIV. Most such illnesses, however, are NOT related to HIV.

Risk from all exposures is probably increased if the exposure involves a larger volume of blood or a higher amount of HIV in the patient’s blood. Source-patients near death with AIDS or patients with symptoms of acute HIV infection usually have higher amounts of HIV in their blood.

The Emergency Department (ED) physicians will help to assess if there is any significant risk to you, and if there is, then you will consult immediately with, and be followed by, an infectious disease specialist. Treatment may be offered to you which may reduce the risk of you becoming infected with HIV. Even if your risk is considered very low you can undergo testing, if you so desire, and be followed in the Occupational Health Clinic to be sure that you have not become infected.

II. Hepatitis B:

Hepatitis B is a viral infection involving the liver which constitutes an important risk associated with needlestick exposures. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted much more easily than HIV.

The risk of transmission of HBV after an exposure depends on the amount of the virus in the blood or body fluid and correlates with the presence or absence of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) in the source patient. Estimates of infectivity range from 2 percent (HBeAg absent) to 40% (HBeAg present).

The risk of HBV infection from body fluids, other than blood, is much lower.

Fortunately, we have treatment available that helps considerably in preventing the development of hepatitis B and will lessen its severity if you become infected. We also have a safe and effective vaccine which is required for almost all health care workers at WRAMC. Your ED physician will assess the risk that you may have been exposed and prescribe appropriate therapy and/or follow-up in Infectious Disease Clinic as required. Should you develop: yellow color in the normally white portion of your eyes, marked darkening of your urine; or significant nausea and abdominal pain during the next six months, please return for re-evaluation, as these may be signs of hepatitis.

III. Hepatitis C:

Hepatitis C is another viral liver infection, and used to be the most common transfusion-associated infection, known as non-A, non-B hepatitis. We now have a screening test for hepatitis C which permits the exclusion of most infected blood from use. Even more commonly than with hepatitis B, hepatitis C can progress to chronic liver disease.

The risk of getting hepatitis C from a known positive source is not well established, but appears to be about 2-10% by needlestick blood exposure.

If your ED physician finds that the source might represent a significant risk for hepatitis C, you will be given a referral to the Infectious Disease (ID) Clinic. Unfortunately, unlike hepatitis B, no passive or active immunization products are yet available to prevent hepatitis C infection.

The Occupational Health Clinic (OHC) provides follow-up for detection and assistance in obtaining care for illness incurred by your exposure. Follow-up occurs at the following time frames:

Following evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), you should report to the Occupational Health Clinic (the same day or next business day if after hours or on the weekend) to initiate follow-up and set up your file. The WRAMC Uniform Needlestick, Sharp Injury, And Blood / Body Fluid Exposure Report will be reviewed for completeness to gather data to help prevent further exposures.

Approximately 10 days after exposure, you will be notified, by e-mail, of lab results ordered in the ED and or the OHC. If you are not available by e-mail, a phone call will be placed to your work site requesting you contact OHC. Additional tests, immunizations or care are ordered at this time, if necessary.

If you and the source’s labs are normal your file will be closed and transferred to your medical record. If the source’s lab testing was not done, but there is a low risk assessment, your file will close unless you wish to continue with follow up. If you wish to continue with follow up, please contact OHC as above.

If your file is not closed, six (6) weeks and three (3) months after exposure, you will be notified that lab work needs to be repeated. The lab tests ordered depend on the circumstances of your exposure. This is an important time frame, since most conversions to disease take place six to twelve weeks after exposure.

Six (6) months after exposure, you will be contacted again for necessary lab work. If all tests are normal after this follow-up your BBP exposure record is closed and filed to your medical record. Some facilities follow exposures for 12 months and if you desire additional follow-up, the Occupational Health Clinic will repeat labs at 12months.

Lab work is ordered at the above time frames through CHCS. Just report to the main lab (Bldg 2, 2nd floor) with your ID card. Once lab results have returned, you will be contacted with results.

Your cooperation is needed to complete this process as efficiently as possible. Thank you in advance.

If you have questions regarding your exposure and would like a consultation, please call The Occupational Health Clinic for an appointment at 782-3611.

General counseling recommendations to prevent the transmission of HIV, hepatitis B and C to others until your case has been closed without evidence of these infections are listed below:

Refrain from donating blood, organs, tissue or semen

Do not share toothbrushes and razors

Safe sex practices to include the use of barriers (e.g., latex condoms). Hepatitis C infection can be transmitted from persons with chronic disease to their steady sex partners, the risk for transmission is low despite long-term, ongoing sexual activity, but having multiple sexual partners has been associated with an increased risk of acquiring hepatitis C. At this time there is insufficient data to recommend changes in current sexual practices for persons with a steady sexual partner. Additional counseling to discuss risk and changes in sexual practices can be obtained through confidential consultation in Preventive Medicine.

Transmission of these viral agents has been shown to occur in pregnancy and possibly in breast milk for HIV. You should contact you personal physician if you are either pregnant or breastfeeding for further guidance.

Occupational Health Section, Preventive Medicine Service 11

January 1999

Section 1

Abbreviations

3TC
Lamivudine

DOD
Department of Defense

NESD
Nursing Education and Staff Development

AD
Active Duty

DOL
Department of Labor

OHC
Occupational Health Clinic

AMEDD
Army Medical Department

EMS
Emergency Medicine Service

OHN
Occupational Health Nurse

AZT
Zidovudine

ER
Emergency Room

OP
Overprint

BMAR
Birth Month Annual Review

HBIG
Hepatitis B immunoglobulin

OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration

BBP
Bloodborne Pathogens

HBV
Hepatitis B virus

PEP
Post-exposure prophylaxis

BBPECP
Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan

HIV
Human Immunodeficiency Virus

PPE
Personal protective equipment

CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

IAW
In accordance with

QI
Quality Improvement

CFR
Code of Federal Regulation

IDS
Infectious Disease Service

RMW
Regulated Medical Waste

CHN
Community Health Nurse

IV
Intravenous

SF
Standard Form

CHS
Community Health Section

JCAHO
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations

SOP
Standing Operating Procedure

CMS
Central Material Supply

LFT
Liver function tests

SRP
Soldier Readiness Processing

DA
Department of the Army

MMWR
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

WRAMC
Walter Reed Army Medical Center

Section II


Terms

Biohazard label
A label affixed to containers of RMW, refrigerator/freezers and other containers used to store, transport or ship blood and other potentially infectious materials. The label must be fluorescent orange-red in color with the biohazard symbol and the word "biohazard" on the lower part of the label.

Handwashing facilities
A facility providing an adequate supply of running potable water, soap and single use towels or hot air drying machines.

Blood
Human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood.

Licensed healthcare professional
A person whose legally permitted scope of practice allows him or her to independently perform the activities required by paragraph 12 of this regulation. (Hepatitis Vaccination, Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-up)

Bloodborne pathogens
Pathogenic micro-organisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV).

Occupational exposure
Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties.

Clinical laboratory
A workplace where diagnostic or other screening procedures are performed on blood or other potentially infectious materials.

Other potentially infectious materials
The following human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids. Also any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead). In addition, HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV- containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

Contaminated
The presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or other potential infectious materials on an item or surface.

Parenteral
Piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needle- sticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions.

Contaminated laundry
Laundry which is soiled with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

Personal protective equipment
Personal Protective Equipment is specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a hazard are not considered to be personal protective equipment.

Contaminated sharps
Contaminated objects that can penetrate the skin including, but not limited to: needles, scalpels, broken glass, broken capillary tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires.

Regulated Medical Waste (RMW)
Liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious materials; contaminated items that would release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semi-liquid state if compressed; items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of releasing these materials during handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and micro-biological wastes containing blood or other potentially infectious materials.

Decontamination
The use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactive or destroy bloodborne pathogens on a surface or item to the point of where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.

Source individual
Any individual, living or dead, whose blood or other potentially infectious materials may be a source of occupational exposure to the employee. Examples include, but are not limited to, hospital and clinic patients; clients in institutions for the developmentally disabled; trauma victims; clients of drug and alcohol treatment facilities; residents of hospices and nursing homes; human remains; and individuals who donate or sell blood or blood components.

Exposed employee
An individual in a healthcare, industrial, administrative or other capacity at WRAMC who may have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the course of his/her employment. For purposed of this plan, students and volunteers are considered employees. Non-federal employees (contract services) are not considered employees of WRAMC and are not required to be listed in appendix B. Contract employees are to be trained in accordance with the contract requirements.

Standard Precautions
A set of precautions designed to reduce the risk of transmission of microrganisms from both recognized and unrecognized sources of infection. This pertains to blood, all body fluids, secretions and excretions except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood, non-intact skin, and mucous membranes.

Engineering controls
Controls that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.

Sterilize
The use of a physical or chemical procedure to destroy all microbial life including highly resistant bacterial endospores.

Exposure control plan
A written program developed and implemented by the employer which sets procedures, engineering controls, personal protective equipment, work practices and other methods that protect employees from exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

Universal Precautions
A set of precautions designed to reduce risk of transmission of micro-organisms by testing all human blood and other potentially infectious materials, as previously defined, as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.

Exposure incident
Eye, mouth, or other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious material.

Work practice controls
Controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in which a task is performed, for example, prohibiting recapping of needles by a two-handed technique.

 

The proponent agency of this pamphlet is the Office of the Preventive Medicine Service. Users are invited to send suggestions and comments on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications) to Commander, WRAMC, ATTN: MCHL-H, Washington, DC 20307-5001.

For the Commander:

Official: Brian P. Foley
Colonel, MS
Deputy Commander for Administration

Michael L. Amaral
Major, MS
Executive Officer

 APPENDIX C

 

(Entire Protocol Has Been Revised)

EMERGENCY MEDICINE SERVICE PROTOCOL FOR BLOOD/BODY FLUID EXPOSURE EVALUATION

CONTENTS

1.  ALL PATIENTS                                                                                                                           C-1

2.  BLOODWORK FOR ALL PATIENTS                                                                                 C-2

     a.  Patient                                                                                                                                  C-2

     b.  Source                                                                                                                                  C-2

3.  SPECIFIC EXPOSURES                                                                                                              C-2

     a.  HIV                                                                                                                                       C-2

     b.  Hepatitis C                                                                                                                            C-6

     c.  Hepatitis B                                                                                                                            C-6

          (1) Source Known positive                                                                                           C-6

          (2) Source High Risk But Not Known Positive                                                               C-6

     d.  Source Unknown                                                                                                        C-7

4.  FOLLOW-UP                                                                                                                              C-8

5.  REQUIRED FORMS FOR BBP EXPOSURE EVALUATION                                                C-9

6.  SAMPLE OF A COMPLETED WRAMC OP 594                                                  Figure   C-1

1.  ALL PATIENTS

    a.  Complete

         (1)  WRAMC Overprint 594, (Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)

         (2)  WRAMC Overprint 2072, (WRAMC Uniform Needlestick, Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)

    b.  Wound care as needed

    c.  Tetanus prophylaxis as needed.

    d.  Provide a copy of Information Sheet For Patients Who Have a Needlestick Injury or Body Fluid Exposure (See Figure 3) and counsel as needed for HIV, hepatitis B and/or hepatitis C.

    e.  Hepatitis B Vaccinated Patients: Check Hep B Surface Antibody(CHCS).  If not previously documented positive, continue vaccination series if 3 doses not completed

    f.  Hepatitis B Unvaccinated Patients: Refer to Allergy/Immunization Clinic for vaccination if at risk for future blood and body fluid exposure (all health care workers).

    g.  Have the source’s physician fill out WRAMC Overprint 593 (Risk Assessment of Known Source)

    h.  See Paragraph 4 for follow-up instructions.

2.  BLOODWORK ALL CASES (Labs listed below based on CHCS listings):

    a.  PATIENT, Order( CHCS lab order set – BBPEXP-Saplan):

         (1)  Hep B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, Check CHCS)

         (2)  Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody(Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

         (3)  Hepatitis C Antibody

         (4)  P3 (Liver Functions Tests)

         (5)  Additional blood work if indicated below.

    b.  SOURCE (Omit any known positives), Order (CHCS lab order set BBPEXP-SAPLAN – Source) 

         (1)  Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

         (2)  Hepatitis B Surface antigen(If known positive, only Hepatitis B e Antigen 

         (3)  Hepatitis C Antibod 

         (4)  P3 (Liver Function Tests)

         (5)  Additional bloodwork if indicated below.

3.  SPECIFIC EXPOSURES: Bloodwork, Treatment, and Follow-up

    a.  Human Immunodeficiency Virus If Source Is Known HIV Positive Or Is High Risk (per WRAMC OP 593):

         (1)  Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076.  If consent denied, indicate on the blood tube that specimen should be stored for 90 days. 

         (2)  Immediate Infectious Disease (ID) Service consult for counseling and to evaluate for possible post-exposure prophylaxis as below 

         (3)  Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP): Follow the Guidelines for management of Occupational Exposure to HIV (Excerpted from MMWR. Vol. 47/No. RR-7 May 15, 1998) as below.  (Refer to table in the next page

Determining the need for HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after an occupational exposure*

STEP 1: Determine the Exposure Code (EC)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* This algorithm is intended to guide initial decisions about PEP and should be used in conjunction with other guidance provided in this report.

†Semen or vaginal secretions; cerebrospinal, synovial, pleural, peritoneal, pericardial, or amniotic fluids; or tissue.

§Exposure to OPIM must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.  In general, these body substances are considered a low risk for transmission in health-care settings.  Any unprotected contact to concentrated HIV in a research laboratory or production facility is considered an occupational exposure that requires clinical evaluation to determine the need for PEP.

¶Skin integrity is considered compromised if there is evidence of chapped skin, dermatitis, abrasion, or open wound.

**Contact with intact skin is not normally considered a risk for HIV transmission.  However, if the exposure was to blood and the circumstance suggests a higher volume exposure(e.g., an extensive area of skin was exposed or there was prolonged contact with blood), the risk for HIV transmission should be considered.

††The combination of these severity factors(e.g., large-bore hollow needle and deep puncture)

contribute to an elevated risk for transmission if the source person is HIV-positive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* This algorithm is intended to guide initial decisions about PEP and should be used in conjunction with other guidance provided in this report.

†Semen or vaginal secretions; cerebrospinal, synovial, pleural, peritoneal, pericardial, or amniotic fluids; or tissue.

§Exposure to OPIM must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.  In general, these body substances are considered a low risk for transmission in health-care settings.  Any unprotected contact to concentrated HIV in a research laboratory or production facility is considered an occupational exposure that requires clinical evaluation to determine the need for PEP.

¶Skin integrity is considered compromised if there is evidence of chapped skin, dermatitis, abrasion, or open wound.

**Contact with intact skin is not normally considered a risk for HIV transmission.  However, if the exposure was to blood and the circumstance suggests a higher volume exposure(e.g., an extensive area of skin was exposed or there was prolonged contact with blood), the risk for HIV transmission should be considered.

††The combination of these severity factors(e.g., large-bore hollow needle and deep puncture)

contribute to an elevated risk for transmission if the source person is HIV-positive.

 

Is the source material blood, bloody fluid, other potentially infectious material  (OPIM),†                or an instrument contaminated

 with one of these substances?

 

Yes Yes

 

  No PEP needed needed  neeneneeneeded

 

 No

 

OPIM§

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blood or bloody fluid

 

                  What type of exposure has occurred?

 

Mucous membrane or skin, integrity compromised¶

 

Intact skin

only

 

Percutaneous

exposure

 

Volume

 

  No PEP Needed

 

          Severity

 

   Small

(e.g.,few drops, short duration)

 

            Large

(e.g., several drops, major blood splash and/or longer duration [i.e., several minutes or more] )

 

 Less Severe

(e.g., solid needle, superficial scratch)

 

  More Severe

(e.g.,large-bore hollow needle, deep puncture,

visible blood on device, or needle used in source patient’s artery or vein)††

 

 EC1

 

    EC 2

 

   EC 2

 

  EC 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Determining the need for HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after an occupational exposure* - continued

STEP 2: Determine the HIV Status Code ( HIV SC )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

§§A source is considered negative for HIV infection if there is laboratory documentation of a negative HIV antibody, HIV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or HIV p24 antigen test result from a speciment collected at or near the time of exposure and there is no clinical evidence of recent retroviral-like illness

¶¶A source is considered infected with HIV(HIV positive) if there has been a positive laboratory result for HIV antibody, HIV p24 antigen or physician-daignosed AIDS.

*** Examples are used as surrogates to estimate the HIV titer in an exposure source fpr purposes of considering {E{ regimens and do not reflect all clinical situations that may be observed.  Although a high HIV titer (HIV SC2) in an exposure source has been associated with an increased risk for transmission, the possibility of transmission from a source with a low HIV titer also must be considered.

STEP 3: Determine the PEP Recommendation

EC       HIV SC           PEP recommendation

1     1    PEP may not be warranted.  Exposure type does not pose a known risk for HIV transmission.  Whether the risk for drug toxicity outweighs the benefit of PEP should be decided by the exposed HCW and treating clinician

1              2            Consider basic regimen‡‡‡Exposure type poses a negligible risk for HIV transmission.  A high HIV titer in the source may justify consideration of Pep.  Whether the risk for drug toxicity outweighs the benefit of PEP should be decided by the exposed HCW and treating clinician.

2              1             Recommend basic regimen. Most HIV exposure type represents an increased HIV transmission risk.

 

2              2             Recommend expanded regimen.§§§Exposure type represents an increased HIV transmission risk.

 

3           1 or 2      Recommend expanded regimen.  Exposure type represents an increased HIV transmission risk.

 

Unknown                      If the source or, in the case of an unknown source, the setting where the exposure occurred suggests a possible risk for HIV exposure and the EC is 2 or 3, consider PEP basic regimen.

 

‡‡‡Basic regimen is for four weeks of zidovudine, 600 mg per day in two or three divided doses, and lamivudine, 150 mg. twice daily.

 

§§§Expanded regimen is the basic regimen plus either indinavir 800 mg every 8 hours or nelfinavir 750 mg three times a day.

 

                        What is the HIV status if the exposure source?

 

HIV negative§§

 

Source unknown

 

Status  unknown

 

HIV positive¶¶

 

No PEP needed

 

                      Higher titer exposure

(e.g., advanced AIDS, primary HIV infection, high or increasing viral load or low CD4 count***)

 

 

Lower titer exposure

(e.g., asymptomatic and high CD4 count***)

 

  HIV  SC 1

 

  HIV SC 2

 

HIV SC Unknown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    b.  HEPATITIS C, If Source Is Known Positive Or is High Risk For Hepatitis C (per WRAMC OP 593):

         (1)  Patient bloodwork: order Hepatitis C Antibody and P3 (LFTs). 

         (2)  Infectious Disease Service follow-up (routine).  Ask patient to bring copy of Emergency Department (ED) evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

    c.  HEPATITIS B:

         (1)  If Source is Known Positive For Hepatitis B (per WRAMC OP 593)

         (a)  For Vaccinated patient, order Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, Check CHCS).

         (b)  For Unvaccinated patient(or history of negative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody titer):

         (i)  Administer Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin 0.06 ml/kg I.M. in the ED.

         (ii)  Patient bloodwork, order

·         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody

·         Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

·         P3 (LFTs)

         (iii)  Source bloodwork, order

·         Hepatitis B e Antigen

         (iv)  Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic to initiate vaccination as soon as possible.

         (v)  ID Service follow-up, 48-72 hours (emphasize importance).  Ask patient to bring copy of ER evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

         (2)  If Source Is High Risk But NOT KNOWN Positive for Hepatitis B per WRAMC OP 593):

         (a)  For Vaccinated patient.

         (i)  Patient bloodwork, order: hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU,

  check CHCS)

         (ii)  Source bloodwork, order:

·         Chronic hepatitis Panel

·         Hepatitis B e Antigen (If known positive for Hepatitis B)

·         P3 ( LFTs)

         (b)  For Unvaccinated patient(or history of negative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody titer):

         (i)  Administer HBIG 0.06ml/kg I.M. in ED 

         (ii)  Patient bloodwork, order

·         Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

·         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody

·         P3 (LFTs)

         (iii)  Source bloodwork, order

·         Chronic Hepatitis panel

·         P3 (LFTs)

         (iv)  Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic to initiate Hepatitis B vaccination ASAP.

         (v)  Infectious Disease Service follow-up, 48-72 hours (emphasize importance).  Ask patient to bring copy of ED evaluation (WRAMC OP 594 and 593 Risk Assessment Sheet).

    d.  SOURCE UNKNOWN:

         (1)  Patient bloodwork, order

·         Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody (Consent required for non-AD, use WRAMC Form 2076)

·         Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (unless previous titer documented >10 MIU, check CHCS)

·         Hepatitis C Antibody

·         P3 (LFTs)

         (2)  Consult to Allergy/Immunization Clinic, if applicable to complete/initiate Hepatitis B vaccination ASAP.

4.  FOLLOW-UP:

    a.  Active Duty and Civilian Employees.

         (1)  All patients should be given a same day consult to OHC for follow-up tracking (next duty day if evenings, weekends, or holidays).  Additional follow-up by ID Service if given Post-exposure Prophylaxis.

         (2)  Place the original of the WRAMC OP 594, OP 593 (Risk Assessment Sheet), and WRAMC Form 1072 and WRAMC Form 1076(for civilians) in the OHC box in the ED.

    b.  Contract Employees, Volunteers and Students:

         (1)  Contract employees, volunteers and students will be given the yellow copy of WRAMC OP 594.

         (2)  The OHC will be responsible for giving the results of initial bloodwork and WRAMC Overprint 600 to the employee, volunteer or student.

         (3)  Contract employees, volunteers and students will seek follow-up care from the source of medical care identified in their contract agreement with the forms given to them by the ED and the OHC.

5.  REQUIRED FORMS FOR BBP EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND THEIR DISPOSITION


 

 

 

 

FORM

 

 

 

PURPOSE

 

 

 

COMPLETED BY

 

DISPOSITION

 

 

Employees – Active Duty/Civilian

 

Contract/Students/

Volunteers/DOD Beneficiary

 

WRAMC OVERPRINT 594

(Needlestick or Blood/Body Fluid Exposure)*

 

 

Document evaluation of patient

 

 

ED Physician see Figure 1

 

Original OHC for Medical record

Pink Copy to ED

Yellow Copy to patient

 

Original to OHC for patient’s MD

Pink Copy to ED

Yellow Copy to OHC for patient

WRAMC  OVERPRINT 593     (Blood & Body Fluid Exposure: Patient, Risk Assessment of Known Source)*

Document risk assessment of source for use in determining treatment of patient

Physician of source  See Figure 2

Original to OHC

Pink Copy to ED

Original to OHC                  

Pink Copy to ED

WRAMC Form 2072          (WRAMC Uniform Needlestick Sharp Injury, and Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Report)*

Collect information on bloodborne pathogen exposure

 

Patient

 

Original to OHC for Medical Record 

 

Original to OHC    

WRAMC Form 2076   (Informed Consent & Agreement to HIV Testing)*#

For non-active duty patients, to document informed consent and agreement to HIV testing

 

 

Patient

Original to OHC for Medical Record   Copy to ED

Original to OHC 

Copy to ED

WRAMC  OVERPRINT 601 (Healthcare Provider's Opinion for Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure)#

Document that patient has been informed of the results of evaluation

 

 

OHC Staff  and patient

Original to OHC for Medical Record  Pink Copy to ED                               Yellow Copy to patient

 

 

Not applicable

WRAMC  OVERPRINT 600 (Results of Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Incident Evaluation)#

 

Summary of exposure incident and evaluation

 

 

OHC Staff 

 

Original for OHC for Medical Record   Copy to OHC

 

Original for patient's MD                    Copy to OHC

WRAMC Form 1332 (Supervisor's Report of Occupational Accident)

Document circumstances and result of accident

Supervisor and employee

Original for Safety Office               Copy for supervisor and employee

Original for Safety Office

Copy for supervisor and employee

WRAMC Form 1811       

Risk Management/Quality Improvement Report)

Information on the occurrence of an accident or event not consistent with normal patient care and the outcome

Supervisor and employee

Original and 2 to Quality Improvement Office

Original and 2 to Quality Improvement Office